Dayspring Tributary of Great Seneca Creek

Map of All Sites |Water Quality Monitoring


site14 chart Dayspring Tributary of Great Seneca Creek

Organisms Found in 2010

Amphipoda (scuds)
Baetidae (small minnow mayflies)
Capniidae (slender winter stoneflies)
Chironomidae (midges)
Decapoda (crayfish)
Dytiscidae (Predaceous diving beetles)
Elmidae (riffle beetles)
Ephemerellidae (spiny crawler mayflies)
Ephemeridae (common burrower mayflies)
Glossosomatidae (saddlecase maker caddisflies)
Hirudinea (leeches)
Hydrophilidae (water scavenger beetles)
Hydropsychidae (common netspinner caddisflies)
Leptohyphidae (little stout crawler mayflies)
Limnephilidae (northern casemaker caddisflies)
Oligochaeta (aquatic worms)
Perlidae (common stoneflies)
Philopotamidae (fingernet caddisflies)
Planariidae (planarians/flatworms)
Simuliidae (black flies)
Tipulidae (crane flies)
Unknown Anisoptera (dragonflies)
Unknown Zygoptera (damselflies)

ThumbnailMap of Dayspring Tributary
Click on image to see
site within its watershed

4---Jim-Hall-and-Cheryl-Hellner-monitoring

Jim Hall and Cheryl Hellner have monitored the site since 1992.

2 - The area has significant bedrock

The area has significant bedrock.

 3 - Columbine and other wildflowers grace the hillside above the stream

Columbine and other wildflowers grace the hillside above the stream. (photo by Jim Hall)

4 - In October 2010  team leader Jim Hall gave a workshop on the effects of development on Dayspring Tributary

In October 2010, Jim Hall gave a workshop on the effects of development on Dayspring Tributary. (photo by Cathy Wiss)

5 - Jim explains that the stormwater pond upstream of the site overflows during heavy rains

Jim Hall explains that the stormwater pond upstream of the monitoring site overflows during heavy rains. (photo by Cathy Wiss)

1---The-stream,-Fall-2007

The stream, Fall 2007

High water from storms has taken a toll on the stream, Fall 2010. (photo by Cathy Wiss)

 

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